1985 Australia Fifty Dollars - YUL

Fifty Dollars (Paper)
R.A.Johnston / B.W.Fraser
Serial No.:
YUL 651028 (OCRB)
Renniks No.:
Approx. Grade:
Price : $255.00

1985 Australia Fifty Dollars - YUL

Two light corner folds and light wrinkling. Paper is clean and crisp. Nice example.

Even notes in this condition are getting harder to find. 

On 18 July 1944 Florey was appointed a Knight Bachelor.

He was awarded the Lister Medal in 1945 for his contributions to surgical science. The corresponding Lister Oration, given at the Royal College of Surgeons of England later that year, was titled "Use of Micro-organisms for Therapeutic Purposes".

Florey was elected a member of the Royal Society in 1941 and became president in 1958. In 1962, Florey became Provost of The Queen's College, Oxford. During his term as Provost, the college built a new accommodation block, named the Florey Building in his honour. The building was designed by the British architect Sir James Stirling.

On 4 February 1965 Sir Howard was appointed a life peer and became Baron Florey of Adelaide in the State of South Australia and Commonwealth of Australia and of Marston in the County of Oxford. This was a higher honour than the knighthood awarded to penicillin's discoverer, Sir Alexander Fleming, and it recognised the monumental work Florey did in making penicillin available in sufficient quantities to save millions of lives in the war, despite Fleming's doubts that this was feasible. On 15 July 1965 Florey was appointed a Companion of The Order of Merit.

Florey was Chancellor of the Australian National University from 1965 until his death in 1968. The lecture theater at the John Curtin School of Medical Research was named for him during his tenure at the ANU.

*All details taken from Wikipedia for educational purposes only.

Obverse:Howard Walter Florey, Baron Florey OM, FRS (24 September 1898 – 21 February 1968) was an Australian pharmacologist and pathologist who shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1945 with Ernst Boris Chain and Sir Alexander Fleming for his role in the extraction of penicillin.

Reverse:Sir (William) Ian Clunies Ross, CMG (1899–1959) is described as the 'architect' of Australia's scientific boom, for his stewardship of Australia's scientific organisation the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation - CSIRO. In 1943, Clunies Ross was appointed Director of Scientific Personnel in the Commonwealth Directorate of Manpower and also Adviser on the Pastoral Industry to the Department of War Organization of Industry. He held these positions until 1945 while continuing work connected with his university position. At the end of the war he left the university to assist the CSIR in planning sheep and wool-textile research. In 1946 he was appointed a full-time member of the CSIR Executive Committee, which was situated in Melbourne. He served as the executive officer of the CSIR until 1949 when it was renamed the CSIRO. He was chairman of the CSIRO until his death in 1959. During this time he oversaw the release of myxomatosis for rabbit control in Australia.

Watermark: Captain Cook in left panel

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