2005 Australia Fifty Dollars - AA 05 / 06 / 07 - 3 x First prefix

2005 / 6 / 7
Fifty Dollars (Polymer)
I.Macfarlane / H.Stevens / K. Henry
Serial No.:
AA05 868439 / AA06 820138 / AA07 044748
Renniks No.:
R520cF - R520dF - R521aF
Approx. Grade:
Price : $295.00

2005 Australia Fifty Dollars - AA 05 / 06 / 07 - 3 x First prefix

On offer here are 3 first prefix notes from sequential years.

The AA05 + AA06 with the Macfarlane / Henry signatories and the AA07 with Stevens / Henry.

They are all in better than average condition and as per the pictures have some small corner folds and light creasing.

As a sequential prefix run of first prefixes they are certainly a highly desirable collectible to be put away for the future.

At this price it will be a worthwhile investment that will recognise good returns within a few short years.

Two years after her death, the Edith Cowan Memorial Clock was unveiled at the entrance to Perth's Kings Park. Believed to be the first civic monument to an Australian woman, it was built in the face of persistent opposition which has been characterised as "representative of a gender bias operating at the time" (Heritage Council of Western Australia, 2000). Opponents of the monumentclaimed that monuments were inherently masculine and therefore not an appropriate form of memorial to a woman, and that Cowan was not important enough to merit a monument in such a prominent location.

Cowan's portrait was featured on an Australian postage stamp in 1975, as part of a six-part "Australian Women" series. During the WAY 1979 sesquicentennial celebrations, a plaque was laid in St Georges Terrace in her honour.

In 1984 the federal Division of Cowan was created and named after her, and in January 1991 the Western Australian College of Advanced Education was renamed Edith Cowan University (ECU).

Her portrait appears on the Australian fifty dollar note, a polymer banknote that was first issued in October 1995. In 1996 a plaque honouring her was placed in St George's Cathedral. There are references to her in a public art installation in Kings Park that was unveiled in November 1999 to commemorate the centenary of women's suffrage, and in a tapestry that was hung in King Edward Memorial Hospital in 2000 to honour women involved in the hospital.

*All biographical details are taken from Wikipedia for education purposes only.

A remarkable banknote in every way with abundant security features. This note had some extremely special features built into it as security against forgery.  It was a world first and makes these notes highly desirable as collectors items. Collectors value numerous variations of this note. 

The 50 dollar note embraces these following security features:

  1. Within the clear window is printed a stylised image of a compass along with embossing of the number 50. These can be seen seen from either side of the note.
  2. When the note is held up to the light a seven pointed star within a circle is formed by four points on one side of the note combining perfectly with three points on the other.
  3. When the note is held up to the light an image of the Australian Coat of Arms can be seen under other printing.
  4. The words FIFTY DOLLARS are microprinted and can be seen with the aid of a magnifying glass.
  5. Slightly raised printing (intaglio) that can be felt with the fingers is used for the portraits and other major design elements.
  6. Highly intricate multi-coloured fine-line patterns and images appear on each side.
  7. Each notes serial number is printed twice, in black on the reverse of the note. A different font is used for each number. The alpha prefix of two letters is followed by two numerals representing the year of its production followed by a further six numerals. Under ultra-violet light, these serial numbers fluoresce.
  8. Under ultra-violet light the notes denominational patch showing the number 50 becomes visible on the back of the note.


David Unaipon (28 September 1872, Point Mcleay (Raukkan) Mission - 7 February 1967) was an Australian Aboriginal of the Ngarrindjeri people, a preacher, inventor and writer. Today, he is featured on the Australian $50 note in commemoration. David Unaipon was awarded ten patents, including a shearing machine, but did not have enough money to get his inventions developed. He was also known as the Australian Leonardo da Vinci for his mechanical ideas, which included anticipatory drawings for a helicopter design based on the principle of a boomerang and his research into harnessing the secret of perpetual motion. 


Dame Edith Cowan (1861–1932) is best remembered as the very first woman member of the Australian parliament. She was, however, a true Australian pioneer in many ways being a  social worker, feminist and politician.  


With the introduction of the new polymer banknotes we saw the end of the customary Cook watermark. It was replaced with the Variable Optical Security Device in the bottom corner.

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