1988 Australia Ten Dollars Bicentennial - AB18 66

Year:
1988
Denomination:
Ten Dollars Bicentennial
Signatories:
R.A.Johnston / B.W. Fraser
Serial No.:
AB 18 663630
Renniks No.:
R310b
Approx. Grade:
VF
Item:
AB18663630-22F
Price : $22.50

1988 Australia Ten Dollars Bicentennial - AB18 66

This note from the reissue of this series.

Well circulated with some creasing and folds.

Ever since their release these notes have proved to be incredibly popular with collectors.

This example is a good beginners note or collection filler for someone collecting the full run of prefixes.

Priced to sell accordingly.

A didgeridoo is a type of musical instrument that, according to western musicological classification, falls into the category of aerophone. It is one of the oldest instruments to date. It consists of a long tube, without finger holes, through which the player blows. It is sometimes fitted with a mouthpiece of beeswax. Didgeridoos are traditionally made of eucalyptus, but contemporary materials such as PVC piping are used. In traditional situations it is played only by men, usually as an accompaniment to ceremonial or recreational singing, or, much more rarely, as a solo instrument. Skilled players use the technique of circular breathing to achieve a continuous sound, and also employ techniques for inducing multiple harmonic resonances. Although traditionally the instrument was not widespread around the country - it was only used by Aboriginal groups in the most northerly areas - today it is commonly considered the national instrument of the Australian Aborigines and is world renowned as a unique and iconic instrument. Famous players include Djalu Gurruwiwi, Mark Atkins, William Barton, David Hudson, Joe Geiaand shane underwood as well as white virtuoso Charlie McMahon.

*All biographical details are taken from Wikipedia for education purposes only.

The world’s very first polymer banknote. Released in 1988 to celebrate the Bicentennary of Australia.  This note had an extremely special features built into it as security against forgery being a hologram of Captain James Cook..  It was a world first and makes these notes highly desirable as collectors’ items. Collectors value numerous variations of this note due to initial production problems.

 There were 3 releases of this note due to initial technical difficulties with the production techniques.

The first release AB10 – AB33 (with the first 2 digits of the serial number being either 93, 94 or 96) The note had a thin varnish over the hologram which proved to wear out very quickly. When the problem was identified the printing ceased.

The second release AB10-AB57 (followed by regular serial numbers) used the same prefixes as the first release but did not employ the 93,94,96 sequence after it.  When printing resumed on this second run they applied a darker heavier varnish to the note which proved to work a great deal better.

The third release AA00-AA23 were released to the general public in blue colored Bicentennial Commemorative $10 Note Folder. These are the most common on the market given that more people kept them as momentoes and they did not suffer from the initial printing process errors of the previous two issues.

Obverse:

This design included the sailing ship HMS Supply anchored at Sydney Cove with a depiction of the early colonials in the background. These people symbolize all those who have contributed to Australia. From the left we see the early settlers and to right the modern working man.

Reverse:

Reverse includes portraits of the native population, the main picture is a young native youth with ceremonial paint, and in the background is a traditional Aboriginal Morning Star Pole also appearing are other Aboriginal artworks also commissioned by the RBA and a human like figure from the Dream Tme.

Watermark:

1988 Commemorative note was the first to employ the optically variable device of Captain James Cook who first mapped Botany Bay.

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