Australian Copper Bullion – 1 Troy oz – Very limited.

AUD$0.00

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SKU: COL10COPPER-9B Category:

Description

This attractive copper bar was released in very limited numbers by Australian Copper.

They are now no longer on offer and as such have become a desirable collectible.

They make for a fabulous gift to overseas friends. 

Additional information

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Design

Unique in their design and stunning to look at. They even look great just propped up on the bookshelf as a curio. The bars are 1 ounce pure copper bullion running .999 fine.

Finely emblazened on one side is the iconic Sydney Harbour Bridge on a cross hatched background.

On the reverse is the equally iconic Kangaroo bounding across the map of Australia.

Worthy of both collection and display it is beautifully crafted. The high quality strike is the first thing that appeals about it. The bar is in mint condition.

Stamped text is:AUSTRALIAN COPPER BULLION

Bar size: 56 mm x 32 mm

.999 FINE COPPER ONE TROY OUNCE

One troy ounce = 480 grains, or 31.10 grams. There are also 20 pennyweights to a troy ounce. A troy pound contains 12 troy ounces (over 13 avoirdupois ounces) and is equivalent to 373.24 grams. 32.15 troy ounces = 1 kilogram.

History

The Sydney Harbour Bridge is a steel through arch bridge across Sydney Harbour that carries rail, vehicular, bicycle and pedestrian traffic between the Sydney central business district (CBD) and the North Shore. The dramatic view of the bridge, the harbour, and the nearby Sydney Opera House is an iconic image of Sydney, New South Wales, and Australia. The bridge is nicknamed “The Coathanger” because of its arch-based design.

Under the directions of Dr J.J.C. Bradfield of the NSW Department of Public Works, the bridge was designed and built by British firm Dorman Long and Co Ltd of Middlesbrough and opened in 1932. The bridge’s design was influenced by the Hell Gate Bridge in New York. It is also the sixth longest spanning-arch bridge in the world, and it is the tallest steel arch bridge, measuring 134 metres (440 ft) from top to water level. It was also the world’s widest long-span bridge, at 48.8 meters (160 feet) wide, until construction of the new Port Mann Bridge in Vancouver.

*Taken from Wikipedia for educational purposes only.