1990 Australia Five Dollars QFD Consecutive Serials x 4

AUD$160.00

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SKU: QFD158865x4-15J Categories: , Tag:

Description

Finding these smaller runs is always great. The second last issue of paper banknotes with the Fraser / Higgins signature combination.

They are very affordable given their age and condition and make a nice addition to any collection with the conscutive serial numbers.

This run of four notes is in perfect bank fresh condition. 

A quarter of a century old and a wonderful investment.

 

Additional information

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History

In 1846 Chisholm returned to England, with her husband, to encourage migration to Australia and to promote migration reform. Before leaving the colony, Chisholm had collected over six hundred statements from settlers around New South Wales, and she published many of these in England to support her arguments for greater migration. Chisholm gave evidence before two committees in the House of Lords and gained support for some of her initiatives, including free passage to Australia for the wives and children of former convicts, but there was little official support for family migration.

In 1849, with the support of wealthy Londoners, such as Wyndham Harding F.R.S.., Chisholm established the Family Colonization Loan Society. The Society lent migrant families the money they needed to travel to Australia, with agents in Australia finding employment for new arrivals and collecting the loan repayments. The Society also chartered its own ships to transport the new colonists. With the discovery of gold in Australia interest in migration rose sharply, and by 1854 the Society had assisted more than 3000 people to travel to Australia. Chisholm continued to agitate for reform, and the Passenger Act of 1852 was passed to ensure better shipboard conditions for migrants. Captain Archibald Chisholm left for Australia in March 1851 as colonial agent, leaving Caroline with increased duties. Caroline toured Britain, Germany, France and Italy, where she visited Pope Pius IX. Her comments on shipboard conditions ensured the passing of the Passenger Act of 1852.

*All details taken from Wikipedia for educational purposes only.

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