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2005 Australia Post FDC – Australian Parrots

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SKU: FDC24PARROTS-1C Category:

Australia Post FDC – 2005 – Australian Parrots

Mint condition first day cover with a full strip of 5 stamps bearing 5 different parrots.

This is a really nice FDC and was issued at Rainbow Beach Queensland.

A real delight to look at and a fabulous addition for the serious collector.

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Standard First Day Cover from Australia Post

Parrots, also known as psittacines /ˈsɪtəsaɪnz/, are birds of the roughly 372 species in 86 genera that make up the order Psittaciformes, found in most tropical and subtropical regions. The order is subdivided into three superfamilies: the Psittacoidea (‘true’ parrots), the Cacatuoidea (cockatoos) and the Strigopoidea (New Zealand parrots). Parrots have a generally pantropical distribution with several species inhabiting temperate regions in the Southern Hemisphere as well. The greatest diversity of parrots is in South America and Australasia.

Characteristic features of parrots include a strong, curved bill, an upright stance, strong legs, and clawed zygodactyl feet. Many parrots are vividly coloured, and some are multi-coloured. The plumage of cockatoos ranges from mostly white to mostly black, with a mobile crest of feathers on the tops of their heads. Most parrots exhibit little or no sexual dimorphism. They form the most variably sized bird order in terms of length.

The most important components of most parrots’ diets are seeds, nuts, fruit, buds and other plant material. A few species sometimes eat animals and carrion, while the lories and lorikeets are specialised for feeding on floral nectar and soft fruits. Almost all parrots nest in tree hollows (or nest boxes in captivity), and lay white eggs from which hatch altricial (helpless) young.

Parrots, along with ravens, crows, jays and magpies, are among the most intelligent birds, and the ability of some species to imitate human voices enhances their popularity as pets. Trapping wild parrots for the pet trade, as well as hunting, habitat loss and competition from invasive species, has diminished wild populations, with parrots being subjected to more exploitation than any other group of birds.[6] Measures taken to conserve the habitats of some high-profile charismatic species have also protected many of the less charismatic species living in the same ecosystems.

*All details taken from Wikipedia for educational purposes only.

History

Rainbow Beach is a coastal town in south-eastern Queensland, Australia, near Gympie. At the 2006 census, Rainbow Beach had a population of 999.The town’s name derives from the rainbow-coloured sand dunes surrounding the settlement; according to the legends of the Kabi people, the dunes were coloured when Yiningie, a spirit represented by a rainbow, plunged into the cliffs after doing battle with an evil tribesman.Much of the sand colors stem from the rich content of minerals in the sand, such as rutile, ilmenite, zircon and monazite. A black dune of ilmenite sands, overgrown by dune vegetation can be found north west of the main town and offers a secret place of beauty for the nature enthusiast. This is currently being removed for sale in China with complete removal expected to take two years. Originally a sand-mining community, gazetted in 1969, the town’s economy is now heavily influenced by tourism. Double Island Point, a popular destination amongst 4WD enthusiasts, is located east of town. Vehicular ferries for Fraser Island depart from Inskip Point, north of town. The Cooloola Section of the Great Sandy National Park borders the town to the south. A number of walking tracks through the national park depart from the southern outskirts of Rainbow Beach. By road, Rainbow Beach is located 75 km from the Bruce Highway town of Gympie, and 239 km from the Queensland state capital, Brisbane.

*All historical information taken from Wikipedia for educational purposes only.

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