2016 Australia Five Dollars Next Generation First and Last Prefix AA-EJ -5

AUD$59.50

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SKU: 2016Australia5dollarsAA161361557-EJ160908357 Categories: , Tag:

Description

Brilliant offer here. The first prefix AA and last prefix EJ new, crisp and clean from the new Next Generation Five Dollars notes series. Be very quick.

Until stocks run out, Noteworthy Collectibles is offering these special combination pairs of first prefix AA16 and last prefix EJ16.  

Both notes are in pristine, uncirculated condition. 

Be quick as others are beginning to buy these up.

Additional information

SKU

Year

Denomination

Signatories

Serial No.

Renniks No.

Approx. Grade

History

Overall, Australia’s counterfeiting rate is relatively low compared with many other countries. In particular, Australia has avoided the high levels of counterfeiting that some other countries have experienced. Australia’s counterfeiting rate peaked at 25 ppm in 2015. By contrast, Brazil, Canada, Mexico and the United Kingdom have all reported counterfeiting rates in excess of 100 ppm in the last 15 years. Notably, Canada’s counterfeiting rate reached a peak of 470 ppm in 2004 while the United Kingdom reached a peak of over 300 ppm in 2008. As a result, Canada issued a new series of banknotes between 2001 and 2006 and ‘aggressively withdrew’ the previous series, while the United Kingdom has issued the first denomination in a new series, with further denominations to be issued in coming years (Fung and Shao 2011). Both countries also made the move to polymer as part of their push to further enhance the security of their banknotes.

Overall, Australia’s counterfeiting rate is relatively low compared with many other countries. In particular, Australia has avoided the high levels of counterfeiting that some other countries have experienced. Australia’s counterfeiting rate peaked at 25 ppm in 2015. By contrast, Brazil, Canada, Mexico and the United Kingdom have all reported counterfeiting rates in excess of 100 ppm in the last 15 years. Notably, Canada’s counterfeiting rate reached a peak of 470 ppm in 2004 while the United Kingdom reached a peak of over 300 ppm in 2008. As a result, Canada issued a new series of banknotes between 2001 and 2006 and ‘aggressively withdrew’ the previous series, while the United Kingdom has issued the first denomination in a new series, with further denominations to be issued in coming years (Fung and Shao 2011). Both countries also made the move to polymer as part of their push to further enhance the security of their banknotes.

Taken from Reserve Bank of Australia Publications Bulletin March 2017 for educational purposes only.

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