1966 Australia Ten Dollars x 3 - SBF

Ten Dollars (Paper)
H.C.Coombs / Roland Wilson
Serial No.:
SBF 777221 -2 - 3
Renniks No.:
Approx. Grade:
SBF777221x3- 36B
Price : $325.00

1966 Australia Ten Dollars x 3 - SBF

Once in a while something very special comes along and this is exactly one of those.

These 3 notes from the first year of production have consecutive numbers and are in mint UNC condition which is in itself a rarity.

As a bonus you have the fantastic semi solid serial numbering in the 777222.

Altogether it is one of the nicest triples from this period that we have seen.

As an investment, unbeatable. As a collectible, highly desirable. Your chance to own a pristine piece of history.

In 1903 Lawson bought a room at Mrs Isabel Byers' Coffee Palace in North Sydney. This marked the beginning of a 20 year friendship between Mrs Byers and Lawson. Despite his position as the most celebrated Australian writer of the time, Lawson was deeply depressed and perpetually poor. He lacked money due to unfortunate royalty deals with publishers. His ex-wife repeatedly reported him for non-payment of child maintenance, resulting in gaol terms. He was gaoled at Darlinghurst Gaol for drunkenness and non-payment of child support, and recorded his experience in the haunting poem "One Hundred and Three" - his prison number - which was published in 1908. He refers to the prison as "Starvinghurst Gaol" because of the meagre rations given to the inmates.

At this time, Lawson became withdrawn, alcoholic, and unable to carry on the usual routine of life.

Mrs Byers (née Ward) was an excellent poet herself and although of modest education, had been writing vivid poetry since her teens in a similar style to Lawson's. Long separated from her husband and elderly, Mrs Bryers was, at the time she met Lawson, a woman of independent means looking forward to retirement. Bryers regarded Lawson as Australia's greatest living poet, and hoped to sustain him well enough to keep him writing. She negotiated on his behalf with publishers, helped to arrange contact with his children, contacted friends and supporters to help him financially, and assisted and nursed him through his mental and alcohol problems. She wrote countless letters on his behalf and knocked on any doors that could provide Henry with financial assistance or a publishing deal.

It was in Mrs Isabel Byers' home that Henry Lawson died, of cerebral hemorrhage, in Abbotsford, Sydney in 1922. He was given a state funeral. His death registration on the NSW Births, Deaths & Marriages index is ref. 10451/1922 and was recorded at the Petersham Registration District. It shows his parents as Peter and Louisa. His funeral was attended by the Prime Minister Billy Hughes and the Premier of New South Wales, Jack Lang (who was the husband of Lawson's sister-in-law Hilda Bredt), as well as thousands of citizens. He is interred at Waverley Cemetery. Lawson was the first person to be granted a New South Wales state funeral (traditionally reserved for Governors, Chief Justices, etc.) on the grounds of having been a 'distinguished citizen'.

*All biographical details are taken from Wikipedia for education purposes only.

Obverse: Francis Howard Greenway (20 November 1777 – September 1837) was an iconic colonial architect in Australia.

Reverse:Henry Lawson (17 June 1867 – 2 September 1922) was an Australian writer and poet . Along with his contemporary Banjo Paterson, Lawson is among the best-known Australian poets and fiction writers of the colonial period, and is often called Australia's "greatest writer".

Watermark: Captain Cook in left panel

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