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1985 Australia Two Dollars x 5 – LHB

AUD$49.95

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SKU: LHB259166X5-6C1 Categories: ,

Crisp and fresh, mint UNC notes that will enhance any collection.

These smaller runs are at an affordable price but offer a great investment potential.

SKU

Year

Denomination

Signatories

Serial No.

Renniks No.

Approx. Grade

Design

Obverse:John Macarthur (1767 – 11 April 1834) was a soldier, entrepreneur, politician and pioneer of the Australian wool industry. Macarthur was born in Plymouth, Devon, the second son of Alexander Macarthur, who had fled to the West Indies after the Jacobite Rising before returning and working as a linen draper and ‘seller of slops’, according to some accounts. His exact date of birth is unknown, but it is known that his birth was registered on 3 September 1767. He spelled his surname “M’Arthur” for most of his life. He occasionally varied it to “MacArthur”. The spelling “Macarthur” (with a lower case “a”) became established only very late in his life.

Reverse:William James Farrer (3 April 1845– 16 April 1906) was a leading Australian agronomist and plant breeder. Farrer is best remembered as the originator of the “Federation” strain of wheat, distributed in 1903. His work resulted in significant improvements in both the quality and crop yields of Australia’s national wheat harvest, a contribution for which he earned the title ‘father of the Australian wheat industry’.

Watermark: Captain Cook in left panel

History

Cook’s second voyage marked a successful employment of Larcum Kendall’s K1 copy of John Harrison’s H4 marine chronometer, which enabled Cook to calculate his longitudinal position with much greater accuracy. Cook’s log was full of praise for this time-piece which he used to make charts of the southern Pacific Ocean that were so remarkably accurate that copies of them were still in use in the mid-20th century.

Upon his return, Cook was promoted to the rank of post-captain and given an honorary retirement from the Royal Navy, with a posting as an officer of the Greenwich Hospital. He reluctantly accepted, insisting that he be allowed to quit the post if an opportunity for active duty should arise. His fame now extended beyond the Admiralty; he was made a Fellow of the Royal Society, and awarded the Copley Gold Medal for completing his second voyage without losing a man to scurvy. Nathaniel Dance-Holland painted his portrait; he dined with James Boswell; he was described in the House of Lords as “the first navigator in Europe”. But he could not be kept away from the sea. A third voyage was planned and Cook volunteered to find the Northwest Passage. He travelled to the Pacific and hoped to travel east to the Atlantic, while a simultaneous voyage travelled the opposite route.

*All details taken from Wikipedia for educational purposes only.

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