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1988 Australia Ten Dollars Bicentennial Issue – AB30 93

AUD$70.00

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SKU: AB30938861-217K Category:

This delightful banknote is from the very first release of the Australias first polymer banknotes.

It is in absolutely beautiful condition and is made that little bit rarer due to the miscutting of the bottom edge resulting in an concave accent of the lower edge.

Most of these notes were swiftly recalled and production stopped due to miriad flaws in the printing process including the Cook hologram peeling off.

Notes that survived in near perfect condition are a collectors dream.

Incredibly popular with collectors since their release and a super addition to any investment portfolio.

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Design

The world’s very first polymer banknote. Released in 1988 to celebrate the Bicentennary of Australia.  This note had an extremely special featuresbuilt into it as security against forgery being a hologram of Captain James Cook. It was a world first and makes these notes highly desirable as collectors items. Collectors value numerous variations of this note. due to initial production problems.

There were 3 releases of this note due to initial technical difficulties with the production techniques.

The first release AB10 – AB33 (with the first 2 digits of the serial number being either 93, 94 or 96) The note had a thin varnish over the hologram which proved to wear out very quickly. When the problem was identified the printing ceased.

The second release AB10-AB57 (followed by regular serial numbers) used the same prefixes as the first release but did not employ the 93, 94, 96 sequence after it.  When printing resumed on this second run they applied a darker heavier varnish to the note which proved to work a great deal better.

The third release AA00-AA23 were released to the general public in blue colored Bicentennial Commemorative $10 Note Folder. These are the most common on the market given that more people kept them as mementoes and they did not suffer from the initial printing process errors of the previous two issues.

Obverse:
This design included the sailing ship HMS Supply anchored at Sydney Cove with a depiction of the early colonials in the background. These people symbolize all those who have contributed to Australia. From the left we see the early settlers and to right the modern working man.

Reverse:
Reverse includes portraits of the native population, the main picture is a young native youth with ceremonial paint, and in the background is a traditional Aboriginal Morning Star Pole also appearing are other Aboriginal artworks also commissioned by the RBA and a human like figure from the Dream Time.

Watermark:
1988 Commemorative note was the first to employ optically variable device of Captain James Cook who first mapped Botany Bay.

History

Though Indigenous Australians are seen as being broadly related as part of what has been called the Australoid race, there are significant differences in social, cultural and linguistic customs between the various Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander groups.

The word aboriginal has been in the English language since at least the 16th century, to mean, “first or earliest known, indigenous”. It comes from the Latin word aborigines, derived from ab (from) and origo (origin, beginning). The word was used in Australia to describe its indigenous peoples as early as 1789. It soon became capitalised and employed as the common name to refer to all Indigenous Australians.

Strictly speaking, Aborigine is the noun and Aboriginal the adjectival form; however the latter is often also employed to stand as a noun. Use of either Aborigine(s) or Aboriginal(s) as a to refer to individuals has acquired negative connotations in some sectors of the community, and it is generally regarded as insensitive and even offensive. The more acceptable and correct expression is Aboriginal Australians or Aboriginal people. The term Indigenous Australians, which also includes Torres Strait Islander peoples, has found increasing acceptance, particularly since the 1980s.

*All biographical details are taken from Wikipedia for education purposes only.

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