1997 Australia Fifty Dollars - ED 97

Year:
1997
Denomination:
Fifty Dollars (Polymer)
Signatories:
I.Macfarlane / E. A. Evans
Serial No.:
ED 97 653810
Renniks No.:
R518a
Approx. Grade:
VF
Item:
ED97653810-6N5
Price : $100.43

1997 Australia Fifty Dollars - ED 97

Some folds but still a nice example.

Circulated but not overly creased.

The right note at the right price for this very early period.

Unaipon was obsessed with correct English and in speaking tended to use classical English rather than that in common usage. His written language followed the style of John Milton and John Bunyan.

Unaipon was inquisitively religious, believing in an equivalence of traditional Aboriginal and Christian spirituality. His employment with the Aborigines' Friends' Association collecting subscription money allowed him to travel widely. The travel brought him into contact with many intelligent people sympathetic with the cause of Aboriginal rights, and gave him the opportunity to lecture on Aboriginal culture and rights. Although he was much in demand as a public speaker he was often refused accommodation and refreshment due to his race.

Unaipon was the first Aboriginal writer to publish in English, the author of numerous articles in newspapers and magazines, including the Sydney Daily Telegraph, retelling traditional stories and arguing for the rights of Aborigines. Some of Unaipon's traditional Aboriginal stories were published in a 1930 book, Myths and Legends of the Australian Aboriginals, under the name of anthropologist William Ramsay Smith. They have recently been republished in their original form, under the author's name, as Legendary Tales of the Australian Aborigines.

*All biographical details are taken from Wikipedia for education purposes only.

A remarkable banknote in every way with abundant security features. This note had some extremely special features built into it as security against forgery.  It was a world first and makes these notes highly desirable as collectors items. Collectors value numerous variations of this note.

The 50 dollar note embraces these following security features:

  1. Within the clear window is printed a stylised image of a compass along with embossing of the number 50. These can be seen seen from either side of the note.
  2. When the note is held up to the light a seven pointed star within a circle is formed by four points on one side of the note combining perfectly with three points on the other.
  3. When the note is held up to the light an image of the Australian Coat of Arms can be seen under other printing.
  4. The words FIFTY DOLLARS are microprinted and can be seen with the aid of a magnifying glass.
  5. Slightly raised printing (intaglio) that can be felt with the fingers is used for the portraits and other major design elements.
  6. Highly intricate multi-coloured fine-line patterns and images appear on each side.
  7. Each notes serial number is printed twice, in black on the reverse of the note. A different font is used for each number. The alpha prefix of two letters is followed by two numerals representing the year of its production followed by a further six numerals. Under ultra-violet light, these serial numbers fluoresce.
  8. Under ultra-violet light the notes denominational patch showing the number 50 becomes visible on the back of the note.


Obverse:
David Unaipon (28 September 1872, Point Mcleay (Raukkan) Mission - 7 February 1967) was an Australian Aboriginal of the Ngarrindjeri people, a preacher, inventor and writer. Today, he is featured on the Australian $50 note in commemoration. David Unaipon was awarded ten patents, including a shearing machine, but did not have enough money to get his inventions developed. He was also known as the Australian Leonardo da Vinci for his mechanical ideas, which included anticipatory drawings for a helicopter design based on the principle of a boomerang and his research into harnessing the secret of perpetual motion.

Reverse:
Dame Edith Cowan (1861–1932) is best remembered as the very first woman member of the Australian parliament. She was, however, a true Australian pioneer in many ways being a  social worker, feminist and politician.

Watermark:  
With the introduction of the new polymer banknotes we saw the end of the customary  Cook watermark. It was replaced with the Variable Optical Security Device in the bottom corner.

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